• 1
  • 2
  • 3

Deacon Thielen to be ordained a priest June 4

By The Register
 
Salina — Deacon Luke Thielen will become Salina’s newest priest when he is ordained by Bishop Edward Weisenburger on June 4 at Sacred Heart Cathedral.
The ordination Mass begins at 10 a.m. with a reception immediately following in the Hall of Bishops. Both are open to all.
Deacon Thielen, 28, is the son of  Tom and Esther Thielen of Quinter. He graduated from Quinter Junior-Senior High School and attended Tabor College in Hillsboro for two years before transferring to Conception Seminary College in Conception, Mo. He recently completed his studies at Saint John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver.
During his time in Denver, he has worked at several parishes.
“Working in the parish has really fostered the love for parish life and wanting to serve the people in the parish,” Deacon Thielen said. “I’m looking forward to finally settling down in a place and really getting to know a community — in seminary you serve a parish for nine months and start all over the next year.”
Deacon Thielen was a member of the Totus Tuus summer catechism program for five years and was a member of the Prayer and Action team in 2012 during his seminary years. Prior to entering the seminary, he was a counselor at CYO camp in 2005, 2006 and 2007. Deacon Thielen also spent a pastoral year at Sacred Heart Parish in Colby.
His assignment as a new priest will be announced following the ordination.
The new Father Thielen will celebrate his first Mass at 10 a.m. Sunday, June 5, at Sacred Heart Church in Park.
 
Chalice found in home parish a mystery 
 
Park —When it came time for Deacon Luke Thielen to find a chalice to use upon his ordination to the priesthood, he didn’t have to look far. In fact, the chalice he will use was nestled in a cupboard of his home parish for many years.
When he celebrates his First Mass June 5, Deacon Thielen will use a chalice from his home parish, Sacred Heart, in Park.
He and his mother, Esther, found the chalice by happenstance one day before Mass in the sacristy at Sacred Heart Church in Park.
“Someone opened a cupboard and there was a very tarnished chalice,” Deacon Thielen said. “I told my mom I wanted that chalice when I was ordained a priest.”
The parish archivist, Janet Kaiser, searched for the origins of the chalice.
“Janet did some digging and found nothing. We don’t know where it came from or who it belonged to because it wasn’t engraved,” Deacon Thielen said. “The archivist has pictures and documents going back to the ’30s and the chalice was nowhere to be found.”
The family went through the parish council at Sacred Heart, receiving permission for Deacon Thielen to be given the chalice for personal use.
Upon being given permission to have the chalice, the Thielen family sent it to Gerkens Religious Supplies in Denver to be refurbished. 
“They polished it and re-plated the inside of the cup with gold,” Deacon Thielen said, explaining that the interior of the chalice must be a precious metal because it touches the precious blood.
The connection to home via the chalice will be a special one.
“To have something from the church where I spent my whole life, an item that I will use on almost a daily basis is special,” Deacon Thielen said. “After I die, I plan to give it back to Sacred Heart Church and they can decide who it goes to next.”

Second orphanage reunion in Abilene June 25

Abilene — It had been 65 years since Rita Dussault and Bernadine Schieferecke were two of the nearly 80 children who lived among the Sisters of St. Joseph at the orphanage in Abilene. Yet when the two friends saw one another in 2010 — the first time in more than six decades — the two childhood friends seemed like little girls again as they posed for snapshots and caught each other up on family and fond memories.
When the next St. Joseph Home Reunion begins at St. Andrew in Abilene on June 25, Rita expects to be there. Her daughter plans to accompany her from her home in Texas. But Bernadine will not be there to greet her; she died peacefully in her sleep on May 3, 2014, at age 85. 
Such losses are one of the reasons Sister Jan McCormick decided to organize another reunion. St. Joseph Home closed in 1958, so even the youngest surviving orphans are in their 50s now, and most are much older.
“We don’t want to lose all their stories,” Sister Jan explained. “We want to come together to remember this history and the people who were a part of it.”
 
  • Orphanage-Overview web
  • 100310-BernadineRita-tight web
 
Six years ago, McCormick, who lives in Chapman, was the driving force who made the reunion happen. She was then a candidate to become a Sister of St. Joseph and she had been dreaming of an orphanage reunion for more than two years. So she put together a committee of Sisters of St. Joseph and Sisters’ Associates in the Abilene area, and hoped that 35 or 40 people might come. 
Instead, 137 attended that October day, including 18 orphans, seven people who­ attended school there as day students, two people whose grandparents had lived there when St. Joseph was also a home for the aged and numerous other relatives and friends. Also on hand were almost 35 Sisters of St. Joseph.
The sole surviving Sister of St. Joseph of Concordia who served at the orphanage is Sister Gilbe­­rta Appelhans, who today lives at Mount Joseph Senior Village in Concordia. Due to her frail health, she will not be able to attend the June gathering.
The reunion may feature photos of her along with many of the other sisters who ministered there. Sister Jan said displays will include photographs and other memorabilia from the home that was located just north of the city.
Working with Sister Jan to organize this second reunion are Sisters Carolyn Juenemann, Mary Lou Roberts and Cecilia Green.
The daylong event will include a video about the home, a memorial service, reminiscences by people attending and a box lunch catered by the Brookville Hotel.
 

Suggestions offered for carrying out Works of Mercy

Salina — Pope Francis says the Year of Mercy is a time to remember how we are called to show mercy because mercy has first been shown to us.

And how do we show mercy? Guiding Catholics are the Spiritual and Corporal Works of Mercy, a list of 14 “works” based on Jesus’ teachings.

But that list might be a bit daunting, so Father Steve Heina, moderator of the Office of the New Evangelization for the Diocese of Salina, offers some ideas that might make the process a little easier.

With thanks to Bill Scholl, consultant for the Office of Social Justice at the Archdiocese of Kansas City, Kan., for his descriptions of each work of mercy, and The Leaven, the Kansas City Archdiocese’s newspaper, here is a how-to-do-it guide.

Showing mercy is more difficult in today’s world, Father Heina acknowledged.

“Roadblocks exist in helping others,” he said. One can’t simply walk into a prison and offer to help without undergoing training, a background check and a slurry of paperwork. And encountering a person in need on the street might not be the safest thing for an individual to do.

“The hopelessness that Pope Francis sees as so important is evidenced by the difficulty that people in need experience themselves but also the challenges faced by those who reach out. It can be very discouraging,” Father Heina said.

That’s where prayer comes into play.

“Our best human intentions by ourselves are not enough. We need a spiritual supplement to sustain us through the efforts we make to be of service to those in need,” he said.

Father Heina recommends a three-step process in approaching the Works of Mercy.

It begins by giving thanks. Think about how, when and where you have been on the receiving end of a Work of Mercy and give thanks.

Then decide what you would do in turn. The list below provides some common-sense approaches.

Finally, reflect on what God has said or shown you and what you want or need to say to God.

Father Heina said he and a group of the faithful at his parishes — St. Bernard in Ellsworth and St. Ignatius Loyola in Kanopolis — came up with monthly goals.

But with seven Corporal Works of Mercy and seven Spiritual Works of Mercy — and 12 months in the Year of Mercy, from Dec. 8 through next Nov. 20 — it will mean doubling up a few of the months.

Beginning in January, The Register will feature one or two of the Works of Mercy each month with an explanation of what each one means and some suggestions for carrying them out.

But if you want to plan ahead or reflect on the Works of Mercy during this Advent seasons, here is the entire list:

Read more...

Indulgences available as part of Holy Year of Mercy

The Holy Year traditionally begins with the opening of the Holy Door to represent a renewed opportunity to encounter or grow closer to Jesus, who calls everyone to redemption.

Jesus knocks on everyone’s door; he yearns to accompany and nourish everyone. “If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, then I will enter his house and dine with him, and he with me,” the Book of Revelation quotes him as saying.

But doors are also narrow, the late-Cardinal Virgilio Noe, the former archpriest of St. Peter’s Basilica wrote, and people must stoop with humility and “be brought down to size by conversion” in order to be “fit” for eternal life.

That is why passing through a Holy Door is part of a longer process of sacrifice and conversion required for receiving an indulgence granted during a Holy Year.

A plenary indulgence, the remission of temporal punishment due to sin, is offered for pilgrims who also fulfill certain other conditions:

• Enter through the holy door at either Sacred Heart Cathedral in Salina or the Basilica of St. Fidelis in Victoria.

• Kneel in front of the Blessed Sacrament and pray one decade of the Rosary for the pope’s intentions; begin with the Our Father, pray 10 Hail Marys and close with the Glory Be. Then exit the church through the holy door.

• Receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation and the Eucharist within 20 days before or after such a pilgrimage and complete one of the Spiritual or Corporal Works of Mercy.

• Those who are confined to their homes can obtain the indulgence by offering up their sickness and suffering. Those who are imprisoned may receive the indulgence with prayers and the reception of the sacraments in their prison chapel.

Read more...

Holy door opened at Sacred Heart Cathedral

The Holy Year traditionally begins with the opening of the Holy Door to represent a renewed opportunity to encounter or grow closer to Jesus, who calls everyone to redemption.

Jesus knocks on everyone’s door; he yearns to accompany and nourish everyone. “If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, then I will enter his house and dine with him, and he with me,” the Book of Revelation quotes him as saying.

But doors are also narrow, the late-Cardinal Virgilio Noe, the former archpriest of St. Peter’s Basilica wrote, and people must stoop with humility and “be brought down to size by conversion” in order to be “fit” for eternal life.

That is why passing through a Holy Door is part of a longer process of sacrifice and conversion required for receiving an indulgence granted during a Holy Year.

A plenary indulgence, the remission of temporal punishment due to sin, is offered for pilgrims who also fulfill certain other conditions: reception of the Sacraments of Reconciliation and the Eucharist, visits and prayers for the intention of the pope and performing simple acts such as visiting the sick.

 

 

 

 

Featured Events

Catholic News Headlines

  • By Carol GlatzVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Help wipe out bullying and aggression by being better listeners and offering concrete gestures of tolerance and patience, Pope Francis told a group of top YouTubers from around the world. "The level of aggressiveness in our world needs to be dialed down. (The world) needs tenderness, meekness, (people) listening and walking together," he told them and others taking part in a world congress sponsored by Scholas Occurrentes. "Pride, arrogance -- eradicate them. Because pride and arrogance always have a bad ending," he said May 29 at the close of the three-day meeting at the Vatican. The pope met privately -- for an informal closed-door Q-and-A session -- with a dozen young YouTubers, people who create their own videos or vlogs, or video blogs, and share them on YouTube. The YouTube "celebrities" who were invited to meet the pope have, when tallied together, about 25 million subscribers. The pope also met privately with U.S. film stars, Richard Gere, Salma Hayek and George Clooney, who were honored at the congress for working to help marginalized young people. The pope sat in on the closing portion of the world congress, which was dedicated to dialogue and social integration. He heard personal testimonies, including from a young woman who was born in Mexico, moved to Chicago and was the victim of bullying for years. The pope called for an end to "aggression, bullying" when answering one of two questions from the audience. "Bullying is an aggression that conceals profound cruelty, and the world is cruel" with wars representing "the monuments of cruelty," he said. Recalling photographs he received from a nun picturing a child massacred in a civil war unfolding in Africa, Pope Francis said bullying is the same kind of cruelty because it "massacres" the mind. In order to build a better world, "we need to eradicate all forms of cruelty," he said. It is important to listen to others and ask questions -- not argue right away -- but inquire in order to truly understand the other person's point of view and find points in common, he said. Dialogue isn't a soccer match or a debate because "in dialogue everyone wins, no one loses," he said. "Even if I think differently, don't argue, but rather, persuade softly." It's also important people feel like they belong, which can even include "a virtual belonging" -- being part of something meaningful online, he said. "It's urgent to offer some kind of belonging," he told his audience. The pope also urged participants to work harder at practicing the "language of gestures." "Sometimes we like to talk, talk," he said, but "we risk paying lip service and this doesn't work." Talking is not enough and sometimes what is needed is "a smile that gives hope, looking in someone's eyes, gestures of approval, patience, tolerance." Of the many new initiatives Scholas organizers announced at the congress, one included an invitation for young people to ask Pope Francis a question at www.askpopefrancis.com. Selected questions and replies will then be published in a book in various languages and countries in the autumn. Scholas Occurrentes is a project Pope Francis supported as archbishop of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and expanded as pope. Through schools it links students from different neighborhoods, countries, economic backgrounds and faiths to promote communication, understanding and cooperation.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • By Junno Arocho EstevesVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Pope Francis called on Catholics and Orthodox Christians to pray for children in Syria who are suffering because of the ongoing conflict in the country. "The children of Syria invite children from all over the world to join in their prayer for peace" on International Children's Day June 1, he said. Before praying the Angelus May 29, the pope said Catholic and Orthodox Christians would be taking part together in the special prayer for peace and that the children were "the protagonists" by inviting all the world's children to unite with them in prayer. The joint Day of Prayer for Peace, sponsored by the Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need, is one of several initiatives meant to promote peace in Syria. The pope's invitation echoes that of Catholic leaders and Orthodox patriarchs in the country, who signed a joint message inviting Christians around the world to join them in praying for peace. The message says: "We pray to him -- the Christ, the king of the universe, who carries the world in his hand, in the arms of his mother -- to bless all the children of Syria. We implore him, who alone can bring peace: 'Protect and save the children of this land! Hear our prayers, now! Delay no longer in granting peace to our land! Look upon the tears of the children; dry the tears of the mothers; let the cries of grief at last fall silent!'" - - -Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: CNS/Paul HaringBy Junno Arocho EstevesVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Deacons are called to be servants who set aside their own self-serving plans and are generous with their lives, Pope Francis said. A servant "is not a slave to his own agenda," but rather always is prepared for the unexpected and responds, even if that means ignoring the parish schedule, the pope said May 29 at a Mass for the Jubilee of Deacons in St. Peter's Square. "It pains my heart when I see a schedule in the parishes -- 'from this time to that time' -- and then, the door is closed. There is no priest, no deacon, no layperson to welcome the people. This is wrong. Have the courage to ignore the schedule," he said. Thousands of deacons and their families, braving the increasingly hot and humid Rome weather, attended the final Mass of the three-day Year of Mercy celebration dedicated to the diaconal ministry. In his homily, the pope reminded them that in order to proclaim Christ, one must first imitate him and "strive to become a servant." "If evangelizing is the mission entrusted at baptism to each Christian, serving is the way that mission is carried out. It is the only way to be a disciple of Jesus," the pope said. The first step in becoming "good and faithful servants," he continued, is to be available to others and detached from living life in one's own way. A true servant doesn't "hoard his free time," but gives up "the idea of being the master of his day." "One who serves is not a slave to his own agenda but ever ready to deal with the unexpected, ever available to his brothers and sisters and ever open to God's constant surprises," he said. Reflecting on the Sunday Gospel reading, in which a centurion humbly asks Jesus to heal his servant, the pope noted the soldier's meekness. Despite his authority to insist or force Jesus to come to his house, "he was modest and unassuming, he did not raise his voice or make a fuss." "Meekness is one of the virtues of a deacon. When a servant is meek, he is a servant and doesn't try to mimic the priests. No, he is meek," the pope said. Pope Francis said that like the servant healed by Christ, deacons must have "a healthy heart" that has been healed by God through forgiveness and constant dialogue with Jesus through daily prayer and the sacraments. "You can offer the Lord your work, your little inconveniences, your weariness and your hopes in an authentic prayer that brings your life to the Lord and the Lord to your life. When you serve at the table of the Eucharist, there you will find the presence of Jesus, who gives himself to you so that you can give yourselves to others," he said. - - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: CNS photo/Jim Lo Scalzo, EPABy Carol ZimmermannWASHINGTON (CNS) -- Immediately after the Supreme Court sent the contraceptive case back to the lower courts May 16, some called the decision a punt -- the football analogy of sending the ball back to the other team -- or in this case the lower courts.But the analogy falls short on a practical level because the seven consolidated cases in Zubik will be sent back to the lower courts with a very different look -- bearing the stamp of being vacated by the nation's high court. The 3rd, 5th, 10th and D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals -- which ruled in favor of the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive mandate and did not see it as posing a substantial burden to the petitioners' free exercise of religion -- now must give another look at the issue equipped with the new information submitted to the Supreme Court showing a possible compromise. Although the justices' unanimous decision in Zubik v. Burwell took many by surprise, others said they saw something like this coming when the Supreme Court essentially showed its hand asking both sides to provide ways to implement the contraceptive mandate that would satisfy both sides. "Contrary to most press coverage, this was not a punt," said Michael McConnell, a law professor at Stanford Law School in California, writing about the Zubik ruling. He described the decision as "a compromise in which the Little Sisters won the case but no precedent was set for the future. This is unorthodox, but arguably Solomonic," he added. Hannah Smith, senior counsel for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which is representing the Little Sisters of the Poor in the case, similarly didn't buy the sports analogy that grabbed headlines. "I don't see it as a punt at all," she told Catholic News Service May 27. She said the Supreme Court was not just returning the cases to the lower courts but was "very specific in its order and outlined several points" such as forbidding the government from levying fines on the groups that objected to the contraceptive coverage, erasing previous court decisions and telling the courts to essentially find a feasible resolution. In other words, when the court sent these cases back, it also sent guidelines for a new way forward. Smith said the court's decision was essentially telling the federal government: "You can do this in a different way, now you have to go back and do it." She said it is going to take some time for this to work through the courts and she couldn't predict a time frame for it. It has already been nearly five years that religious groups have been involved in challenging the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive mandate. The Department of Health and Human Services announced an "interim final rule" in August 2011 requiring that coverage of contraceptives approved by the Food and Drug Administration be included in most employees' health plans. The rule provided a narrow religious exemption to the mandate that only applied to houses of worship and did not include most religious universities, schools, social service agencies, outreach ministries or health care providers. The plaintiffs don't seem daunted by the time it is taking for a resolution. Washington Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl said in a statement after the Supreme Court's decision that the court's opinion offered a path forward but "this struggle will continue." The Washington Archdiocese is one of seven plaintiffs in the consolidated Zubik case. Now the question for both sides is whether the courts follow the Supreme Court's cue and find a compromise. In a post for scotusblog.com, University of Notre Dame law professor Richard Garnett wrote that the courts could possibly "extend unwarranted deference to the government's assertions about 'compelling interests' and the least restrictive ways of accomplishing them or engage in ungenerous second-guessing of religious claimants' descriptions of the burdens imposed by government action on their religious exercise." Legal experts say the government could either decline to cooperate on a solution or could change its regulations to implement the Supreme Court's opinion and adopt a less restrictive alternative for religious employers who currently would need to have a third party to provide contraceptive coverage through their health insurance. However, the government would still need to determine how to accommodate religious objectors that self-insure. While the final outcome hangs in the balance, Garnett said the case itself highlights a troubling sign about the accommodation of religion. "To the extent, the right to religious freedom is regarded as a luxury good, a license to do wrong, or as special pleading by the culture war's losers, it is increasingly vulnerable," Garnett wrote. "This should concern us all, because believers and nonbelievers alike benefit from a legal and cultural commitment to religious freedom and have a stake in the legal regime that respects and protects it." - - - Follow Zimmermann on Twitter @carolmaczim.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: CNS photo/Lucy Nicholson, ReutersBy WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Archbishop Jose H. Gomez of Los Angeles said in a May 25 statement that a planned increase in federal immigration raids is "yet another depressing sign of the failed state of American immigration policy." The raids were announced in mid-May. Archbishop Gomez' comment was echoed by Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio L. Elizondo, chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Migration. The archbishop is chairman-elect of the committee. "These operations spark panic among our parishes," Bishop Elizondo said in a May 25 statement. "No person, migrant or otherwise, should have to fear leaving their home to attend church or school. No person should have to fear being torn away from their family and returned to danger." While saying he recognized the federal government's role in upholding immigration laws, he said the deportations would not be "an effective deterrent" to migration because these "vulnerable populations" are facing a humanitarian crisis in their home countries. On May 24, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement personnel deported a mother and her 14-year-old daughter from the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas. ICE took the action despite knowing that the family was afraid of being killed in their home country, that their asylum claim had never been heard, and despite knowing that attorneys had requested a stay of removal and were in the midst of filing an appeal, according to Katie Shepherd, managing attorney for the Cara Family Detention Pro Bono Project, which provides legal representation and undertakes advocacy on behalf of mothers and children held in federal family detention centers. According to Shepherd, ICE also knew that attorneys had requested a stay of removal for the family and were in the midst of filing an appeal. "ICE swiftly deported the mother and her child, informing counsel only after the fact. It is outrageous that, knowing that her appeal was in the works and that she had expressed a fear of return, ICE chose to hustle the family out of the detention center in the dark of night and put them on a plane before the courthouse doors opened," Shepherd said in a May 25 statement. "Just like in January, we are seeing mothers and children who are confused, disoriented, and terrified for themselves and their children," she added. In January, Bishop Elizondo and Bishop Kevin W. Vann of Orange, California, chairman of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, wrote to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson about recent raids that had netted 121 undocumented immigrants in a three-day span, many of them mothers and children. "Our organizations have firsthand knowledge that these actions have generated fear among immigrants and have made their communities more distrustful of law enforcement and vulnerable to misinformation, exploitation and fraud," the two bishops told Johnson. "To send migrant children and families back to their home countries would put many of them in grave danger because they would face threats of violence and for some, even death." CLINIC is one of four partners in the Cara Project. The others are the American Immigration Council, the American Immigration Lawyers Association and the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services. "This family is just the latest in the string of lives destroyed by a government that refuses to administer our refugee protection system with the care it requires. Sadly, ICE's harsh enforcement tactics will put many more vulnerable people at risk," said the Cara Project's Shepherd. Bishop Daniel E. Flores of Brownsville, Texas, also issued a statement May 25 about the new wave of deportation raids. "Children and families should not be used as pawns in a politics of deportation aimed more at maintaining the illusion that we have a viable immigration policy in this country than at actually addressing the issue," he said. "The entire system needs reform; it fails to protect the most basic of human goods. Those fleeing violence should be accorded due process protection." Over the past year or more, the Brownsville Diocese, which is in the Rio Grande River Valley, has had an increase of immigrants with numbers as high as 200 on some days. Mostly from Central America, the immigrants receive help at the diocesan respite center at Sacred Heart Church in McAllen at continue north to other states. Michelle Mendez, who represents some clients for CLINIC and does training and legal support as well, also moderates a closed Facebook page for women who were detained. Introduced just last October, the group, she said, now has 750 members. Having worked in direct services for many years prior to joining CLINIC, Mendez said, "I learned that clients, despite lacking sophistication in some areas, had on their phones What's App or something that's cheaper to call internationally and Facebook, because they want to connect with folks all over." On the page, "we give them guidance on the removal proceedings," Mendez said. "They have a lot of misinformation or lack of information. They think that reporting to ICE on a monthly basis is the same as going to court. Or that changing your address with ICE is the same as changing your address with the court." Neither is true, she added, and some women have been tripped up by this false belief. - - - Contributing to this story was Mark Pattison.  - - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.