The Register

 

August 11, 2017

In this issue

  • Catholic Charities annual FUNdraiser.
  • Three new seminarians enter formation for diocese.
  • Serving in the summer.

 


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Catholic Charties’ Annual FUN-draiser

The Register 

Salina — While the annual Catholic Charities of Northern Kansas fundraiser had many lighthearted moments, the heart of the evening was the 6,500 services provided to individuals in 39 counties.  “I am always amazed by the overwhelming generosity of our supporters,” Catholic Charities Executive Director Michelle Martin said. “We are just so blessed to be surrounded by such genuinely caring donors who want to help others.”  More than 200 supporters gathered at the Salina Country Club on July 23 to help Catholic Charities raise more than $300,000, which Martin said is the best fundraiser to date.  “We are so grateful to the wonderful people of this diocese for their compassion towards helping others,” she said.  This year’s donation match was $100,000. Martin said donors hit the $100,000 mark, so their dollars were doubled.  The fundraiser supports 25 percent of Catholic Charities’ annual budget. Another 25 percent of the $1.2 million budget is supported by the Catholic Charities Annual Appeal, which is Aug. 12-13.  With 19 staff members in three offices, Martin said Catholic Charities offers 15 core programs. Yet even with a broad range of programs, the heart of them is to assist with financial stabilization and family strengthening.

With a new headquarters open in Salina, hours have expanded.  “As we found a place that was more visible here, we felt like it would benefit the individuals we serve if we had hours beyond just 8 to 5,” Martin said in her speech at the fundraiser. “We needed to be more flexible, so staff stepped up.”  The Salina office is now open on Tuesday and Thursday nights, as well as Saturday mornings. 

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Three new seminarians enter formation for diocese

Salina — Three new men will enter into formation as seminarians for the Diocese of Salina this fall.  Gavin Sedlacek of Manhattan, Jesse Ochs of Park and Aaron Dlabal of Wilson all will enter Conception Seminary College in Conception, Mo. 

Sedlacek, 21, grew up at Seven Dolors Parish in Manhattan. The son of Kent and Lisa Sedlacek, he is the fourth of five children. His siblings are Kelsie, Brennan, Elly and Corbin.  He attended two years at Kansas State University in Manhattan, studying history.  Entering the seminary was a fleeting thought during his younger years.  “I didn’t give it much serious thought until I was a senior in high school,” Sedlacek said. “This last semester, I was praying in adoration one day, and I thought God was calling me to (the seminary). I’m trying to answer God’s call.”  He was involved in Prayer and Action, the summer service project sponsored by the Diocesan Office of Youth Ministry, as well as attended NCYC, attended the annual CYO convention, was on the Diocesan Youth Council for one year and attended Junior CYO as a camper, then went back as a counselor for four years.  

“I would probably say the reason I stayed Catholic is because I was involved with the youth ministry,” Sedlacek said. “Through my involvement in the diocese, it gave me a deeper appreciation and understanding of my faith. It helped me fall in love with the sacraments and open me up to the possibility of priesthood.”  Prayer and Action heavily influenced his prayer life. He served on the team in 2015.  “It gave me the desire to serve others,” he said. “It showed me what it means to be a Christian, a Catholic in this world by helping out your neighbors. Being on the team was a great opportunity to give back what I had received in my five years (as a participant). I loved being able to connect with the youth and being able to serve.”

Ochs, 23, grew up at Sacred Heart Parish in Park. The son of Richard and Judy Ochs, he has one older brother, Luke.  He attended K-State, and graduated in 2016 with a degree in social work. He worked for St. Francis Community Services in Colby upon college graduation.  College was a fruitful time for spiritual growth.  “I was highly involved with St. Isidore,” he said. “I was an active participant in the choir. I was in the choir almost every Sunday when I was there. I was involved in quite a few different Bible studies with Father Jarett (Konrade).”  Prior to college, he was involved in Prayer and Action.  “Prayer and Action had a very big impact on my decision (to enter the seminary),” Ochs said. “That’s really where my faith grew significantly. The knowledge of the faith and my love of Christ and for others grew through that mission trip. Serving others and finding a better prayer life helped me pray enough to make the decision to go to the seminary.”  Ochs spent the summer teaching Totus Tuus. He also taught in 2015.

Committing to praying about the decision and embracing more structure in his prayer life assisted Ochs with finding clarity.  “Participating in adoration has helped quite a bit (in discernment),” he said. “Becoming more strong in my prayer life, becoming more consistent helped.”  As he worked through the process of discernment, Ochs said he discussed the possibility of the seminary with his parents.  “They support it fully,” he said.”That certainly helped my decision.”  At his home parish and in college, Ochs participated in the choir and as a cantor.  “Music is what really brings me closer to Christ,” he said. “Especially being a cantor and in the choir has been a huge impact on my faith.”

Dlabal, 18, is a graduate of Wilson High School and member of St. Wenceslaus in Wilson. The son of Jim and the late Rosemary Dlabal, he has three siblings: Joshua, Justine and Ethan.  Prayer and Action, the diocese’s summer program, let Dlabal meet other seminarians and receive advice on discernment.  “The first year, (Deacon) Andy Hammeke said when you find your vocation, you’re at peace with yourself, even if you don’t know what will happen or how to prepare for it, you’ll be at peace,” Dlabal said.  Dlabal, a recent Wilson High School graduate, said he took his question to his quiet, empty hometown church, St. Wenceslaus in Wilson.

Father Gale Hammerschmidt, co-vocation director for the diocese, said it’s been nearly a decade since a seminarian entered immediately after high school graduation.  During high school, Dlabal was involved with CYO at his parish, as well as participated in Prayer and Action and Totus Tuus. He was also on the CYO Diocesan Youth Council.  In the parish, he is a lector, cantor and altar boy. At school, he participated in cross country, track, theater, drama, Scholars Bowl, science club, National Honor Society and Student Council.

For more information about vocational discernment, contact Father Gale Hammerschmidt, co-vocation director at (785) 539-7496 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .  For more information about financially supporting seminarian education, contact Beth Shearer­, Director of Stewardship and Development for the Salina Diocese at (785) 827-8746 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Bead by Bead

Story & Photos by Karen Bonar

The Register

Burr Oak — Three friends sit around the large table in the community library. The group, informally called “Our Lady, Untier of Knots,” gathers weekly to talk, laugh and catch up on life while they string rosary beads.  “We all seem to need to have another rosary in front of us as you make one,” said Burr Oak resident Judy Donley, who started the group. “It must take a different part of your brain to build them than pray it.”  “This morning, I made four sets and I forgot all of the Our Father beads,” Pat Windmuller chimed in.  “You never notice at the beginning when you have a mistake. You never notice until the end,” Leah Garman added.  

The group gathers weekly at the Burr Oak Community Library in the northern Kansas town of about 150 people. The town’s Catholic church, St. James, closed in 1915.  Making rosaries was something Donley sort of fell into. She bought supplies in the winter of 2015 and began making twine rosaries as she watched TV in the evening.  “I started making them because I like praying the rosary and doing crafty stuff,” she said. “I’m also a recent convert, so I’m on fire.”  She joined the Church in 2012.

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Serving in the summer

Story & Photos by Karen Bonar

The Register

Burr Oak — Three friends sit around the large table in the community library. The group, informally called “Our Lady, Untier of Knots,” gathers weekly to talk, laugh and catch up on life while they string rosary beads.  “We all seem to need to have another rosary in front of us as you make one,” said Burr Oak resident Judy Donley, who started the group. “It must take a different part of your brain to build them than pray it.”  “This morning, I made four sets and I forgot all of the Our Father beads,” Pat Windmuller chimed in.  “You never notice at the beginning when you have a mistake. You never notice until the end,” Leah Garman added.

The group gathers weekly at the Burr Oak Community Library in the northern Kansas town of about 150 people. The town’s Catholic church, St. James, closed in 1915.  Making rosaries was something Donley sort of fell into. She bought supplies in the winter of 2015 and began making twine rosaries as she watched TV in the evening.  “I started making them because I like praying the rosary and doing crafty stuff,” she said. “I’m also a recent convert, so I’m on fire.”  She joined the Church in 2012.  As she started to expand the rosary-making operation, she began exploring beyond rope rosaries. It was then she encountered Our Lady of Rosary Makers online and shifted into producing rosaries with plastic beads.

She invited friends and members of all three area parishes to participate and set up shop once a week in the local library. Anywhere from three to four people gather weekly.  “The rosary is so powerful that I really wanted to do it,” Windmuller said. “It’s nice, it’s fellowship. I feel like we’re doing something good for somebody.”  It’s not only about creating an mechanism for prayer for others, though.  “We say the “Our Lady Untier of Knots” prayer we pray before we start,” Garman said. “If something is on our hearts, we’ll pray a decade while we’re here. Or sometimes we’ll pray a decade as we make them.”  “You can’t not pray when you’re making them,” Donley chimed in.  The group meets for about two hours every week. Garman said she can make about eight rosaries in one sitting.  “I think I can make about four (rosaries) an hour … if I don’t stop and talk,” she said. 

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Popular EWTN host to speak at annual banquet

Hays – Brian Patrick, a popular host of the Eternal Word Television and Radio Network will be the featured speaker at Divine Mercy Radio’s annual banquet from 6 to 9 p.m. Sept. 9 in the Little Theatre of Holy Family Elementary, 1800 Milner in Hays. His talk is titled “Mercy in Motion.”
 
Patrick will talk about his personal experience of God’s mercy, a gift that has led to his becoming the most noted personalities at EWTN. Patrick will tell his story and also talk about some of the interesting people he has interviewed over the years.
“It will be a different talk than we’ve had in the past,” said Donetta Robben, Executive Director of Divine Mercy Radio. “Brian Patrick will be entertaining, humorous and spiritually motivating. When we hear these personal stories, it makes us realize how God is working in our own lives.”
 
Currently Patrick is co-host of EWTN’s “Morning Glory,” which airs at 7 a.m. Monday through Friday on Divine Mercy Radio, KVDM in Hays and KRTT in Great Bend, both at 88.1 FM. He’s the former news anchor of EWTN’s News Nightly, and the former host of the “Sonrise Morning Show.” He also anchored “Crossing the Goal” with Danny Abramowicz, a former star player in the National Football League, Curtis Martin, founder of FOCUS Missionaries and Peter Herbeck, Vice President of Renewal Ministries. Patrick has been in the radio-TV field for nearly 45 years.
 
Tickets for the banquet are $45 if purchased before Aug. 15. After Aug. 15, the ticket price goes up to $50. The banquet includes hors d’oeuvres with wine or beer as well a full meal, including salad, choice of chicken cordon bleu or a beef fillet, roasted potatoes, summer vegetable medley, dinner rolls as well as carrot or chocolate cake for dessert. Tickets are available online at dvmercy.com, by calling the studio at (785) 621-4110 or coming to Divine Mercy Radio at 108 E. 12th St. in Hays during office hours, which are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Event allows families to gather, pray together

The Register

Salina — Families gathered to listen and pray in Colby July 28 and in Salina July 29 as part of the Night of Prayer and Praise for Children and Families.  In Colby, Jennifer Bentzinger reflected on how family life can be a springboard for spiritual life.  “Family life is a powerhouse for sanctification,” she said. “Family life provides us with a wealth of opportunities to be sanctified — to be made holy — and to seek sainthood.”  She said having children and starting a family drastically altered her spiritual life.  “I look back at my pre-children days and miss my old prayer life,” Bentzinger said. “Daily holy hours and spiritual reading. Daily Mass. The rosary. With the birth of my first child, all of that seemed to slip away and I found myself barely able to make it to Mass on Sundays and lucky to remember to bless my food before meals. After mourning the loss of my former spiritual life, I have come to realize that having a family and having a spiritual life are not, of course, mutually exclusive.”  She said family life sanctifies us by making us die to ourselves and live for others, provides us with the opportunity to be contemplatives in the midst of chaos, sanctifies us by calling us to true, authentic, life-giving love and offers more than enough suffering to lead us all to sainthood.  Bentzinger said while monastic life and family life seem like polar opposites, they are similar. Religious living in monasteries must be obedient to the monastic bell. When it rings, they must stop what they are doing and immediately report for prayer or the specified duty or activity.  “When your toddler demands a drink of water, when your son requests help with is algebra, when the baby is crying, hear instead the monastic bell,” she said. “We ought to embrace the distractions of family life as a means to grow in holiness. It is precisely in the inconvenient interruptions of our spouses and children that God calls to be obedient in our vocation of married and family life.”  Prayer is essential to family life but not always feasible to do in church. She said she takes the opportunity during daily tasks to pray for her family.  “As I chop vegetables and prep meat, I can raise my heart and mind to God by thanking him for the healthy food he has given our family and asking him to provide for those less fortunate,” she said.  Other opportunities for prayer are praying for the individual whose laundry you are washing, folding or ironing.

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‘Register’ your support Donations needed to send newspaper to every household

By The Register

Salina — The Register, the newspaper of the Diocese of Salina, is delivered to all registered parishioners.

To be able to continue to do that, however, requires some help on their part.

Today’s issue includes a donation envelope. Every household is asked each year to donate $25, roughly the cost of printing and mailing the newspaper.

Until three years ago, The Register was mailed only to those who subscribed. In January 2014, the publication model changed, and the newspaper was sent to every household registered with a parish in the diocese.

To accommodate the increased printing and mailing costs — from 5,500 to about 17,500 copies — the decision was made to reduce publication from weekly to twice monthly — on the second and fourth Fridays.

Instead of selling subscriptions, The Register would seek a $25 donation from each family to underwrite the additional costs.

In addition to each household receiving the newspaper, each Register edition also is available online at salinadiocese.org/the-register.