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October 24, 2014

In this issue

Collection key to funding education of future priests
Synod leaves controversial questions open
Predatory lending unfairly targets the poor
Voters must act to protect the sanctity of marriage

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Annual request a key part of funding education of future priests PDF Print E-mail
Written by Doug Weller   
Thursday, 23 October 2014 13:14

Salina — The seminarian collection scheduled for Nov. 8 and 9 in parishes is a key part of educating the Diocese of Salina’s future priests.

The collection typically accounts for one-fourth of the annual amount needed to pay for the educational costs of seminarians.

This year, the diocese has 13 men studying to become priests, the largest number in several years. That blessing comes with higher costs to education them — nearly $500,000 this year.

In a letter to parishioners, Bishop Edward Weisenburger asks for their support in the education of our future priests.

“In discerning God’s call, these men are doing all that we have asked of them. Please join me in likewise responding well by providing for their educational needs,” the bishop writes.

No single means of fundraising covers the annual educational costs, noted Syndi Larez, director of stewardship and development for the diocese. A combination of other local gifts, endowments and grants are utilized.

The diocese fully pays for seminarian education so that no man declines to consider a priestly vocation because of his inability to pay for the education. It can take up to eight years to complete that education.

Larez said the diocese constantly is looking at new sources to help fund seminarian education.

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Hermana dejar diócesis para trabajar en El Paso convento PDF Print E-mail
Written by Doug Weller   
Thursday, 23 October 2014 13:13

Salina — La hermana Esther Pineda dejará su trabajo como director de la oficina del Ministerio Hispano de la diócesis de Salina a asumir un nuevo rol en su congregación.

Se irá al final de octubre para moverse a El Paso, Texas, para supervisar actividades y programas en el convento de las Hermanas de San José de Concordia. La casa de 10 habitaciones actualmente se está utilizando para hospedad a voluntarias que han llegado a ayudar con la afluencia de niños migratorios a los Estados Unidos de América Central.

La hermana que estaba supervisando la casa se enfermo y volvió a Concordia, y la congregación entonces tuvo que decidir si la casa debería seguir estando disponible, y si es así, ¿quién podría asumir los deberes?

“La llamada a la vida religiosa es una llamada a ser disponible cuando hay una necesidad a la cual uno puede responder; a lo que uno puede hacerse disponible para contestar”, dijo la hermana Esther. “Eso me ha traído a dejar la diócesis un poco antes de lo previsto.”

Ella dijo que tenía planeado retirarse de la diócesis el próximo verano después de sus 75 años de edad, pero esperaba continuar trabajando en la oficina de justicia y paz de la congregación en Salina, donde actualmente trabaja a tiempo parcial. Dijo que continuará haciendo este trabajo en El Paso.

Porque el español es su lengua materna y previamente había trabajado en El Paso, dijo que sentía que ella era la opción más lógica.

“Le dije a mi congregación, tal vez, yo puedo hacer esto”, ella dijo.

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Sister to leave diocese to work in El Paso PDF Print E-mail
Written by Doug Weller   
Thursday, 23 October 2014 13:12

Salina — Sister Esther Pineda is leaving as director of the Office of Hispanic Ministry for the Diocese of Salina to assume a new role for her congregation.

She will leave at the end of October to move to El Paso, Texas, to oversee activities and programs at the convent of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia. The 10-bedroom house most recently has been used to house volunteers coming to El Paso to help with the influx of children migrating from Central America to the United States.

The sister who was operating the house became ill and returned to Concordia, and the congregation then had to decide if the house should continue to be made available and, if so, who could assume those duties.

“The call to the religious life is a call to be available when there is a necessity to which one can respond, to which one can become available to answer,” she said. “That has brought me to leave the diocese a little ahead of schedule.”

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Predatory lending unfairly targets the poor PDF Print E-mail
Written by Doug Weller   
Thursday, 23 October 2014 13:10

Kansas bishops launch video project

(Leading up to the November elections, the four bishops in Kansas are reaching out to voters with videos highlighting a key moral issue for them to consider.

• Bishop Edward Weisenburger of the Diocese of Salina talks about usury and payday loans. A story about usury was featured in the Sept. 12 Register.

• Archbishop Joseph Naumann of the Archdiocese of Kansas City, Kan., addresses marriage.

• Bishop John Brungardt of the Diocese of Dodge City speaks on life. It was featured in the Sept. 26 Register.

• Bishop Carl Kemme of the Diocese of Wichita discusses religious freedom. It was featured in the Oct. 10 Register.

The Catholic Church in the United States does not tell people which candidate or political party to vote for but has the responsibility to attempt to form the consciences of Catholics as they prepare to make well-informed decisions.

The YouTube videos can be found at salinadiocese.org and at the Kansas Catholic Conference’s website at www.kscathconf.org and its Facebook page. People are encouraged to spread the messages by sharing the videos and “liking” them on Facebook.)

Salina — Bishop Edward Weisenburger said it is the Catholic teaching of concern for the poor that prompts the Kansas bishops to speak out against predatory lending, or payday loans.

“Our concern for the poor must have a real impact on our personal decision making, as well as our politics, our economics and our culture,” he says in one of four election-year videos prepared by the four bishops of Kansas.

“There are some practices that are plainly harmful to the poor and simply contrary to the teaching of Christ,” he said.

Usury — the charging of an unjust interest rate on a loan — is condemned throughout the Scriptures, and until recent decades, there was an almost universal agreement that predatory lending was unjust, immoral and should be illegal.

“In recent years, however, things have changed,” Bishop Weisenburger said. “The teaching on usury has been forgotten or ignored, and laws regulating it have been watered down or quietly repealed.

Predatory lending is permitted in Kansas and “in towns across Kansas we see the result: an explosion of payday loan establishments that thrive in the poorest parts of town.”

People who find themselves short on funds to pay the bills often turn to payday loans because they lack good credit to obtain a conventional loan, the bishop said.

Most are unable to repay the short-term loans, so they become caught in a vicious cycle, where they take out more short-term loans to repay the original loan.

“Those of us who have never been in such dire financial straits can have difficulty relating to the despair of people trapped by spiraling interest,” he said.

A person who can’t repay the loan within a couple of weeks and can only pay the interest ends up paying 390 percent in interest on the loan in a year’s time. A typical $500 loan that is rolled over repeatedly results in an interest payment of $1,800 for a year.

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Voters must act to protect the sanctity of marriage PDF Print E-mail
Written by Archbishop Joseph Naumann   
Thursday, 23 October 2014 13:05

(Leading up to the November elections, the four bishops in Kansas are reaching out to voters with videos highlighting a key moral issue for them to consider.)

Kansas City, Kan. — Marriage as a covenant of love between one man and one woman is not an arbitrary contrivance of humans but an important part of God’s plan for humanity, says Archbishop Joseph Naumann in a video message for Kansas Catholics.

“I never imagined when I was ordained a priest almost 40 years ago that the definition of marriage as a covenant of love between one man and one woman would become controversial,” said the Kansas City, Kan., archbishop.

“Over the last several decades, a culture that supported strong marriages as the foundation for vibrant family life has suffered a catastrophic breakdown. Like falling dominoes, our society has lost respect for the sanctity of marriage, for its permanence, for its openness to life, and now for complementarity of the sexes being an essential component of authentic marriage.”

The breakdown of marriage hurts the most vulnerable — children, the poor and single mothers — as well as the lives of individuals and society as a whole, he said.

Family is the building block for society and marriage is the glue giving families stability and holding them together, he added.

Men and women are different for a reason, he said, with each bringing something different to a marriage and a family.

“Men and women are not interchangeable, while both are indispensable for human life and human flourishing. This is especially true in family life. No man can be a mother to a child, and no woman can be a father. Every child needs and deserves a father and a mother,” the archbishop said.

“I was raised in a single-parent home. I have nothing but the highest respect for single parents who strive heroically to provide for the needs of their children,” he continued. “Similarly, I have the highest esteem for birth mothers who make one of the greatest human sacrifices because of their love and desire for what is best for their child. Adoptive parents are also modern heroes as they provide a loving family life for an adopted child.”

However, he said, the best environment in which a child can grow and mature, he stressed, “is in a family where the child’s mother and father love each other and together love the child that is fruit of their love.”

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Year’s events to help laity learn more about religious PDF Print E-mail
Written by Catholic News Service   
Friday, 10 October 2014 08:47

Washington — In an effort to help lay Catholics gain a deeper understanding of religious life, priests, brothers and women religious intend to open their convents, monasteries, abbeys and religious houses to the public one day next February.

“If you’ve ever wondered what a brother or religious sister does all day, you will find out,” said Dominican Sister Marie Bernadette Thompson in announcing the open house scheduled for Feb. 8, 2015.

The open house is just one of the events for the upcoming Year of Consecrated Life, which begins the weekend of Nov. 29-30 — the first Sunday of Advent is Nov. 30. It will end Feb. 2, 2016, the World Day of Consecrated life.

The special year dedicated to consecrated life was announced by Pope Francis and is similar to previous themed years announced by popes such as Year of the Priest (2009-10) or Year of St. Paul. (2008-09).

The year also marks the 50th anniversary of Perfectae Caritatis, a decree on religious life, and Lumen Gentium, the Second Vatican Council’s Dogmatic Constitution on the Church. The purpose of the yearlong celebration, according to a Vatican statement, is to “make a grateful remembrance of the recent past” while embracing “the future with hope.”

Bishop Michael Burbidge of Raleigh, N.C., chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Clergy, Consecrated Life and Vocations, announced the Year of Consecrated Life events at an Oct. 1 news conference at the USCCB headquarters in Washington.

He said the scheduled events will provide an opportunity, especially for young people, to see how men and women religious live. He also urged heads of religious orders to let his committee know of activities they are planning so they can be publicized.

Sister Marie Bernadette, council coordinator of the Council of Major Superiors of Women Religious, said the purpose of the open house gatherings will be to provide people with an encounter with men and women religious and also an encounter with Christ.

Sister Marcia Allen, president of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia and president-elect of Leadership Conference of Women Religious, said another initiative for the upcoming year is called “Days with Religious,” during which laypeople will have opportunities to join men and women religious in works of service throughout the summer of 2015.

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Religious freedom goes beyond right to worship PDF Print E-mail
Written by Doug Weller   
Friday, 10 October 2014 08:40

Leading up to the November elections, the four bishops in Kansas are reaching out to voters with videos highlighting a key moral issue for them to consider.

• Bishop Edward Weisenburger of the Diocese of Salina talks about usury and payday loans. The topic was featured in the Sept. 12 Register.

• Archbishop Joseph Naumann of the Archdiocese of Kansas City, Kan., addresses marriage.

• Bishop John Brungardt of the Diocese of Dodge City speaks on life. It was featured in the Sept. 26 Register.

• Bishop Carl Kemme of the Diocese of Wichita discusses religious freedom.

The Catholic Church in the United States does not tell people which candidate or political party to vote for but has the responsibility to attempt to form the consciences of Catholics as they prepare to make well-informed decisions.

The YouTube videos can be found at salinadiocese.org and at the Kansas Catholic Conference’s website at www.kscathconf.org and its Facebook page. People are encouraged to spread the messages by sharing the videos and “liking” them on Facebook.

• • •

Wichita — Bishop Carl Kemme of the Diocese of Wichita says Catholics should not have to apologize for their beliefs nor be punished for them.

But that’s what is happening in today’s political and legal environments, he maintains.

In one of four election-year videos created by the Catholic Bishops of Kansas, Bishop Kemme talks about religious freedom and the right of believers to practice their faith not only privately but in the public square.

The debate over religious freedom “has made clear a very disturbing development: Our country has lost much of its appreciation for — and even an understanding of — religious freedom,” Bishop Kemme says in the video.

“We are so fortunate to live in this country. All one needs to do is turn on the news to see the violence and extreme poverty that so many of our brothers and sisters across the globe must endure. When one sees the persecution Christians are suffering in some parts of the world, it is easy and understandable for Americans to think that all is well here. But friends, all is not well,” he said.

The First Amendment’s guarantee of the “free exercise of religion” never meant merely the right to go to church without being attacked or arrested for one’s faith, he said.

“No, the reason America has been a shining city on a hill is because the First Amendment has guaranteed for all Americans the right to live their faith in their daily life. For Catholics, this has meant the right to live our Catholic faith in every aspect of our lives: at home and at work; in private and in public,” the bishop said.

That extends far beyond a private setting, he maintains.

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Deadline extended for March for Life bus trip PDF Print E-mail
Written by Doug Weller   
Monday, 06 October 2014 14:52

The Salina Diocese Office of Respect Life has extended the deadline to register for a bus trip to attend the March for Life in Washington, D.C., Jan. 20-24.

Jaclyn Brown, who is coordinator of the office with her husband, Eric, said three buses are full and the deadline has been extended until Nov. 1 in an effort to fill a fourth bus.

The cost, however, will increase to $400 per person.

Brown said she would need reservations for at least half of the seats in the fourth bus to justify the extra expenses. If there are not enough reservations received by Nov. 1, then the fourth bus would be canceled, she explained.

To reserve a seat, go online at salinadiocese.org/respect-life or call the Browns at (785) 650-2474 or email them at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it before Nov. 1.

 
Compassion for ‘the least of these’ inspires Respect Life Month activities PDF Print E-mail
Written by Doug Weller   
Thursday, 25 September 2014 15:19

October is set aside by the U.S. bishops as a time for showing support for the sanctity of life from conception to natural death.

This year’s theme, “Each of Us is a Masterpiece of God’s Creation,” is inspired by Pope Francis, who urges humility, warmth and passion for “the least of these” — the elderly, the imprisoned, those with disfiguring disabilities, the unborn and many more, explained Boston Cardinal Sean

O’Malley, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities.

In his 2013 Day for Life Greeting, Pope Francis conveyed that “even the weakest and most vulnerable, the sick, the old, the unborn and the poor are masterpieces of God’s creation, made in his own image, destined to live forever and deserving of the utmost reverence and respect,” Cardinal O’Malley noted.

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Bishop’s fund accepting applications PDF Print E-mail
Written by Doug Weller   
Thursday, 25 September 2014 15:17

The Catholic Community Foundation is currently accepting grant applications for the Bishop’s Fund.

Applications for the Bishop’s Fund are sought once a year from Catholic parishes, parish schools and Catholic entities in the Salina Diocese.

This fund was established in 2008 as an unrestricted fund that would have a specific focus each year as determined by the bishop and the foundation’s board of directors.

The 2014 grants will be awarded for innovative ideas for a Catholic entity within the diocese. The amount of funding will range from $1,000 to $5,000 and will be determined at the Catholic Community Foundation’s December board meeting.

Grant guidelines and applications have been sent to pastors and also are available on the diocesan website under the development tab.

“This is a great way for parishes to get funding for a project that they have been wanting to accomplish and just do not have room in their budget to do it,” said Syndi Larez, executive director of the foundation.

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