• 1
  • 2
  • 3

DISCIPLESHIP IN THE CATHOLIC TRADITION,

Length 27 min.
Age Group A - Adult
Publisher Center for Learning
Topics Catechist Resources


An Overview of This video provides an in-depth look at this new secondary religion series. It presents the concepts, philosophy, strengths, and specifics of the series. This discussion is intended for principals, theology department chairpersons, theology

Featured Events

Catholic News Headlines

  • By Junno Arocho EstevesVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- A former consultant to a pontifical commission who denied to a Vatican court that she leaked documents about the Vatican's financial reform to an Italian journalist had admitted to sending the documents when she was first interrogated, a Vatican policeman said. Stefano DeSantis, an officer investigating the leaking of the documents, testified May 24 that Francesca Chaouqui told Vatican police officials that she sent documents regarding the Vatican Asset Management (VAM) to Gianluigi Nuzzi, author of "Merchants in the Temple." "We never assumed that she gave the documents, she admitted to it," DeSantis told the court. Chaouqui is on trial, along with Msgr. Vallejo Balda, secretary of the Prefecture for the Economic Affairs of the Holy See, and Nicola Maio, the monsignor's former assistant, for "committing several illegal acts of divulging news and documents concerning fundamental interests of the Holy See and (Vatican City) State."  Nuzzi and Emiliano Fittipaldi, author of "Avarice," are accused of "soliciting and exercising pressure, especially on (Msgr.) Vallejo Balda," to obtain the documents. The trial session May 24 began with the cross-examination of Gianluca Gauzzi, deputy commissioner of the Vatican police, by the defendants' lawyers regarding his testimony May 16. Gauzzi revealed the contents found on two iPhones and a Macbook Pro belonging to Msgr. Vallejo Balda. In some of the messages found on the monsignor's devices, Gauzzi said, "Chaouqui asked Msgr. Vallejo to use WhatsApp because she believed it was a secure and tap-proof messaging system." When asked by Laura Sgro, Chaouqui's lawyer, about the examination of the chats between Chaouqui and Msgr. Vallejo Balda, Gauzzi stated that the police saw the message exchange on the Spanish monsignor's phone. Chaouqui, he added, deleted the messaging application from her phone before handing it over to the Vatican's IT experts as part of the investigation. However, because WhatsApp is connected to a person's phone number, the police are certain the messages were between Msgr. Vallejo Balda and Chaouqui even though she deleted the app from her phone, Gauzzi said. Regarding Chaouqui's initial confession of sending Nuzzi the documents, DeSantis told the court that she exhibited "exemplary behavior" when she gave the Vatican police her formal statement and even made clarifications or specifications in her formal declaration. MORE TO COME - - -Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: NS photo/Simon CaldwellBy Simon CaldwellLIVERPOOL, England (CNS) -- Myanmar's first cardinal has thanked the Christians of the West for helping to bring democracy to his country. Cardinal Charles Maung Bo of Yangon said the Catholic Church was "at the forefront" of supporting the people of Myanmar, formerly Burma, during a dictatorship that lasted half a century. Preaching at a May 22 Mass in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool, he declared: "Today, we are free." "The world community refused to accept the oppression ... and spoke against that," Cardinal Bo said. "The church as a community refused to allow the oppression of Christians and others in Burma," he said. "Every church, including the U.K. church, was at the forefront of supporting us." The cardinal told the congregation that Catholics "are united by a special bond of community. It is this sense of community which has helped many Christians around the world to survive hardship and emerge stronger. "My heart is filled with gratitude to all the Christians, civil society leaders and governments, that the sense of community helped them to think of Burma," he added. "Your concern has led us to see the light of democracy, and I urge you to continue to accompany us, especially through your prayers." Cardinal Bo's visit to Liverpool was the final stop of a British tour at the invitation of the charities Aid to the Church in Need and Christian Solidarity Worldwide. His visit came six months after the National League for Democracy won a landslide election that ended about 50 years of dictatorship in the Southeast Asian country. Cardinal Bo told the congregation in Liverpool that the dictatorship was a long "Calvary" for the people of his predominantly Buddhist country. "We were a crucified nation," he said. "Propagation of Christianity was banned, new churches could not be built, and personnel had to be sent out of the country for any training. In many places, being Christian was the greatest liability. "The language and cultural rights of our people were taken away by the one-language, one-race and one-religion policy," he said. "Yet God did not abandon our nation. The church was like the mustard seed and, like the biblical example, it grew into a tree," he said. In the midst of the oppression, he said, the Catholic Church in Myanmar became a "young and vibrant church." "The church grew from just three diocese to 16 dioceses," Cardinal Bo said. "From 100,000 people, we are over 800,000 faithful, from 160 priests to 800 priests, from 300 religious we are now 2,200 religious and 60 per cent of them are below the age of 40." Now, he said, Myanmar sends missionaries to other countries. Cardinal Bo reserved special praise for Aung San Suu Kyi, the democracy campaigner and Nobel Peace Prize winner, whose "moral courage," he said, had defeated "one of the most arrogant armies in the world. He said the periods she spent under house arrest -- 15 of 21 years -- were episodes of "redemptive suffering" that "melted decades of oppression." "A new democracy has been born in this nation," said Cardinal Bo. "Myanmar is proud today that its Easter moment came in the most peaceful manner. "Here was a woman whose belief in peace and nonviolence stands in stark contrast to the violent conflicts in many parts of the world," he said. "It is a great inspiration that peace is possible and moral power still can overcome tremendous suffering."- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • By Carol GlatzVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Holiness doesn't depend on superhuman powers, but rather demands a heart filled with courage, hope and grace that strives for conversion each and every day, Pope Francis said at his morning Mass. In fact, holiness is reached by taking tiny steps, like biting your tongue every time there is the urge to gossip or demean somebody, he said May 24 during the Mass in the chapel of the Domus Sanctae Marthae. "Bite your tongue a little. Your tongue will swell up a bit, but your spirit will be holier," the pope said. "Holiness is a journey. Holiness cannot be bought, it is not sold" and it is not given away as a reward, he said. It is "walking in God's presence in an irreproachable way." Every person is responsible for striking out on a path of holiness, he said. "I have to do it, someone else can't do it in my name. I can pray for someone else to be a saint, but he has to take that path, not me." The holiness Christians must strive for is an "everyday" task often carried out in anonymity, he said. This journey first demands courage, "the courage to move forward," he said. That courage is inspired by hope -- the hope "in an encounter with Jesus." However, people cannot live holy lives on their own. "It is a grace of God and we must ask for it" and be open to receiving it, he said. Christians must not conform themselves to the world, but must "change one's own heart from within -- in an ongoing, daily intense activity within." Conversion isn't telling the priest, "Oh father, for me to convert I must do penance -- give me a clobbering," he said. The process of conversion requires small concrete steps, he said. For example, "If you are able to not speak badly about someone else, you are on the right path for becoming a saint. It's that easy." Tackle the little things and "don't turn back, always move forward" with hope and strength, he said.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: CNS photo/Max Rossi, ReutersBy Junno Arocho EstevesVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- After five years of tension and top-level silence, Pope Francis and the grand imam of one of the most important Sunni Muslim universities in the world embraced at the Vatican May 23. "The meeting is the message," the pope told Ahmad el-Tayeb, the grand imam of al-Azhar University, as the religious scholar approached him just inside the door of the papal library. El-Tayeb's spring visit was the first meeting between a pontiff and a grand imam since the Muslim university in Cairo suspended talks in 2011. Established in 1998, the formal dialogue between al-Azhar and the Vatican started to fray in 2006, after now-retired Pope Benedict XVI gave a speech in Regensburg, Germany. Al-Azhar officials and millions of Muslims around the world said the speech linked Islam to violence. Al-Azhar halted the talks altogether in 2011 after the former pope had said Christians in the Middle East were facing persecution. Al-Azhar claimed that Pope Benedict had offended Islam and Muslims once more by focusing only on the suffering of Christians when many Muslims were suffering as well. In February, Bishop Miguel Ayuso Guixot, secretary of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, delivered a letter to el-Tayeb from Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, council president, inviting him to the Vatican to meet the pope. Cardinal Tauran and Bishop Ayuso welcomed the imam to the Vatican May 23 and accompanied him to the papal meeting. Pope Francis sat to the side of his desk facing the grand imam rather than behind his desk as he customarily does when meeting with a visiting head of state. Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, said the pope spoke privately with el-Tayeb for 25 minutes and the conversation included a discussion about "the great significance of this new encounter within the scope of dialogue between the Catholic Church and Islam." "They then dwelled upon the common commitment of the authorities and the faithful of the great religions for world peace, the rejection of violence and terrorism (and) the situation of Christians in the context of conflicts and tensions in the Middle East as well as their protection," Father Lombardi said in a statement. At the end of the audience, Pope Francis presented the grand imam with two gifts: a copy of his encyclical "Laudato Si', on Care for Our Common Home" and peace medallion depicting an olive tree holding together two pieces of a fractured rock. In an interview after the papal meeting, el-Tayeb said the "circumstances" that led his institution to halt the dialogue with the Vatican "no longer exist," so the Vatican and the university can "continue our holy mission, which is the mission of religions: 'to make people joyful everywhere,'" by teaching them about God. Meeting Pope Francis, "the first impression, which was very strong, is that this man is a man of peace, a man who follows the teaching of Christianity, which is a religion of love and peace," and "a man who respects other religions and shows consideration for their followers," the imam told Vatican Radio and L'Osservatore Romano, the Vatican newspaper. Religious leaders today, he said, have a "heavy and grave" responsibility to teach people the true path to happiness and peace. "Man without religion constitutes a danger to his fellow man, and I believe that people right now, in the 21st century, have started to look around and to seek out wise guides to lead them in the right direction," el-Tayeb said. Al-Azhar, as a reference point for many Sunni Muslims around the world, is engaged in an ongoing program to clarify the meaning of classical Islamic texts and make clear to Muslims, including schoolchildren, that groups claiming to base their violent actions on Islam are promoting "a deviant understanding" of the faith. The Middle East, he said, has seen "rivers of blood and cadavers," in part because of the misuse of religion. "Islam and Christianity have nothing to do with those who kill, and we asked the West not to confuse this deviant and misled group with Muslims," the imam said. "The issue must not be presented as persecution of Christians in the East, but on the contrary there are more Muslim than Christian victims, and we all suffer this catastrophe together." "We must not blame religions because of the deviations of some of their followers," he said, "because in every religion there exists a deviant faction that raises the flag of religion to kill in its name." After meeting the pope, the grand imam was scheduled to travel to Paris to open the second international conference on "East and West: Dialogue of Civilizations" May 24 sponsored by al-Azhar University and the Catholic Sant'Egidio Community. - - - Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: CNS photo/Christina Lee Knauss, The Catholic MiscellanyBy Christina Lee KnaussST. MATTHEWS, S.C. (CNS) -- For years, Matthew Quay picked up paper clips from desks and absent-mindedly straightened them while listening to discussions or presentations at work. He also carried some in his pockets to straighten during Mass at Holy Trinity Church in Orangeburg. It was simply something to do with his hands to help him stay focused, he said. He never figured that simple action would eventually turn into works of art that help persecuted Christians overseas. Last fall, Quay started to experiment with twisting the straightened clips into various shapes. He made a cross. With a few more twists, he formed the corpus of Christ. Within days, he was making beautiful crucifixes out of paper clips, sacred art formed from the simplest of office supplies. Since then, Quay's creations have been displayed at the Orangeburg County Fine Arts Center. Sales of the artwork have raised thousands of dollars to help persecuted and displaced Christians in the Middle East. Around the same time he made his first paper-clip crucifix, Quay was feeling helpless and sad about the plight of families fleeing Syria and other war-torn parts of the Mideast. "In September of 2015, I saw all those images of the refugees, especially that little boy who washed up on the shore in Turkey," he told The Catholic Miscellany, newspaper of the Diocese of Charleston. "It really bothered me because I felt we were so comfortable over here and it seemed like there was nothing we could do. I never thought my feelings about the refugees and my art would come together." In December, his mother, Deni Quay, asked him to sell his work at Holy Trinity's annual Christmas bazaar. Quay, who belongs to Knights of Columbus Council 6891, had recently learned of the Knights' nationwide efforts to raise money for Christian refugees in the Middle East. Finally, he said, he saw a way for his art to help the people who haunted his thoughts. By December, his crucifixes had evolved from simple crosses in one or two colors to larger, more elaborate ones made with clips of varying sizes in many hues. In two days, he made more than $1,400 for the refugee effort. That success prompted Quay to devote even more time to his creations, to expand the complexity and variety of detail, size and color. He purchased paper clips from office supply stores and online sources. People started giving him extras they had around the house. He especially treasures a donation of hundreds of vintage ones that came from the home of a former schoolteacher. Older clips, he said, come in darker, more burnished hues of silver and gold which add a special look to the crucifixes. He found some about 4 inches long in a sale bin at a store. Those large clips ended up being ideal for his big crucifixes, which can be up to 17 inches long and use more than 200 clips. These large pieces take about 18 hours of work to complete, while smaller ones take about four hours. Quay said his inspiration for the colors comes from the seasonal vestments worn by Father Wilbroad Mwape, administrator at Holy Trinity, where he's a member. He also has made crucifixes on request: a gold and white one in the shape of an anchor for a woman who lost a brother in a boating accident, dark blue for a police officer, another with a medal of St. Peregrine for a woman whose family member has cancer. For Christmas, he incorporated clips in Southwestern hues of turquoise and red for his father-in-law, who lives in Texas and loves Native American culture. When he's working, Quay said he spends a lot of time in "meditative thought" but doesn't have a specific prayer routine. Sometimes he prays "lots of Hail Marys," he said, or for various prayer intentions. He is most aware that the crucifixes are God's work through him, especially when he considers what their sales have accomplished in only a few months. A series of simpler figures of Christ affixed to wooden crosses raised more than $950 when his council sold them after Masses. That, combined with money raised from the bazaar and the exhibit, means more than $5,500 will be donated to help refugees. All because of paper clips. "The reaction has been overwhelming," Quay said. "This whole process has really been a series of little discoveries. It's taking a very insignificant thing and making it into something beautiful." - - - Knauss is on the staff of The Catholic Miscellany, newspaper of the Diocese of Charleston.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.