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Tribunal Side Info

Name Rev. Msgr. Barry Brinkman, JCL, JV 
E-Mail barry.brinkman
@salinadiocese.org
Phone (785) 827-8746

 

Name Corey Lyon, JCL
E-Mail corey.lyon
@salinadiocese.org
Phone (785) 827-8746

 

Name Sr. Carolyn Juenemann, CSJ
E-Mail carolyn.juenemann
@salinadiocese.org
Phone (785) 827-8746 Ext. 22
 

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Catholic News Headlines

  • IMAGE: CNS photo/Christina Lee Knauss, The Catholic MiscellanyBy Christina Lee KnaussST. MATTHEWS, S.C. (CNS) -- For years, Matthew Quay picked up paper clips from desks and absent-mindedly straightened them while listening to discussions or presentations at work. He also carried some in his pockets to straighten during Mass at Holy Trinity Church in Orangeburg. It was simply something to do with his hands to help him stay focused, he said. He never figured that simple action would eventually turn into works of art that help persecuted Christians overseas. Last fall, Quay started to experiment with twisting the straightened clips into various shapes. He made a cross. With a few more twists, he formed the corpus of Christ. Within days, he was making beautiful crucifixes out of paper clips, sacred art formed from the simplest of office supplies. Since then, Quay's creations have been displayed at the Orangeburg County Fine Arts Center. Sales of the artwork have raised thousands of dollars to help persecuted and displaced Christians in the Middle East. Around the same time he made his first paper-clip crucifix, Quay was feeling helpless and sad about the plight of families fleeing Syria and other war-torn parts of the Mideast. "In September of 2015, I saw all those images of the refugees, especially that little boy who washed up on the shore in Turkey," he told The Catholic Miscellany, newspaper of the Diocese of Charleston. "It really bothered me because I felt we were so comfortable over here and it seemed like there was nothing we could do. I never thought my feelings about the refugees and my art would come together." In December, his mother, Deni Quay, asked him to sell his work at Holy Trinity's annual Christmas bazaar. Quay, who belongs to Knights of Columbus Council 6891, had recently learned of the Knights' nationwide efforts to raise money for Christian refugees in the Middle East. Finally, he said, he saw a way for his art to help the people who haunted his thoughts. By December, his crucifixes had evolved from simple crosses in one or two colors to larger, more elaborate ones made with clips of varying sizes in many hues. In two days, he made more than $1,400 for the refugee effort. That success prompted Quay to devote even more time to his creations, to expand the complexity and variety of detail, size and color. He purchased paper clips from office supply stores and online sources. People started giving him extras they had around the house. He especially treasures a donation of hundreds of vintage ones that came from the home of a former schoolteacher. Older clips, he said, come in darker, more burnished hues of silver and gold which add a special look to the crucifixes. He found some about 4 inches long in a sale bin at a store. Those large clips ended up being ideal for his big crucifixes, which can be up to 17 inches long and use more than 200 clips. These large pieces take about 18 hours of work to complete, while smaller ones take about four hours. Quay said his inspiration for the colors comes from the seasonal vestments worn by Father Wilbroad Mwape, administrator at Holy Trinity, where he's a member. He also has made crucifixes on request: a gold and white one in the shape of an anchor for a woman who lost a brother in a boating accident, dark blue for a police officer, another with a medal of St. Peregrine for a woman whose family member has cancer. For Christmas, he incorporated clips in Southwestern hues of turquoise and red for his father-in-law, who lives in Texas and loves Native American culture. When he's working, Quay said he spends a lot of time in "meditative thought" but doesn't have a specific prayer routine. Sometimes he prays "lots of Hail Marys," he said, or for various prayer intentions. He is most aware that the crucifixes are God's work through him, especially when he considers what their sales have accomplished in only a few months. A series of simpler figures of Christ affixed to wooden crosses raised more than $950 when his council sold them after Masses. That, combined with money raised from the bazaar and the exhibit, means more than $5,500 will be donated to help refugees. All because of paper clips. "The reaction has been overwhelming," Quay said. "This whole process has really been a series of little discoveries. It's taking a very insignificant thing and making it into something beautiful." - - - Knauss is on the staff of The Catholic Miscellany, newspaper of the Diocese of Charleston.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: CNS photo/Rafael Marchante, ReutersBy Cindy WoodenVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Sixteen years after the Vatican released the text of the so-called Third Secret of Fatima, rumors cyclically arise claiming that the Vatican still is keeping part of Mary's message to three children in Fatima, Portugal, secret. The Vatican press office May 21 took the unusual step of publishing a communique with reaction from retired Pope Benedict XVI, who -- as prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith -- oversaw the secret's publication in 2000 and personally wrote a commentary on it. He insisted at the time that the complete text had been published. In mid-May, a blog published a story claiming a German priest, Father Ingo Dollinger, said that then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger had told him soon after the publication in 2000 that part of the message was still secret. The Vatican communique said: "In this regard, Pope emeritus Benedict XVI declares 'never to have spoken with Professor Dollinger about Fatima,' clearly affirming that the remarks attributed to Professor Dollinger on the matter 'are pure inventions, absolutely untrue,' and he confirms decisively that 'the publication of the Third Secret of Fatima is complete.'"- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: CNS photo/courtesy Father Liam DunneBy Francis NjugunaNAIROBI, Kenya (CNS) -- Missionaries and other Catholics gathered in Nairobi May 23 for a requiem Mass for a Slovak nun killed in Yei, South Sudan. Holy Spirit Missionary Sister Veronika Theresia Rackova, 58, director of St. Bakhita Medical Center in Yei, was shot the night of May 16 while driving an ambulance after taking an expectant mother to the hospital. When the ambulance was attacked by soldiers, Sister Rackova was wounded in the hip and abdomen. After two surgeries in Yei, she was evacuated to Nairobi, where she died May 20. Sister Maria Jerly, regional superior for the Holy Spirit Missionary Sisters, told Catholic News Service that Sister Rackova was shot as people marked John Garang Day. She added that a motive for the shooting was not known. Three soldiers were arrested in connection with the incident, and Sister Jerly added, "One of them is said to have admitted having shot at Sister Rackova." Six of the order's nuns are serving in South Sudan, mainly in the Yei Diocese. Sister Jerly told CNS the congregation did not plan to leave the area. "On the contrary, we would like to continue giving services to the needy people of this great country of South Sudan," she said, adding, "Some of our sisters are right now tormented over the incident, but we plan to continue to carry our badly needed services by the needy people of this country." Sister Jerly said Sister Rackova would be buried in Kenya, and that the Divine Word Fathers, the sisters' male counterparts in Kenya, would handle the arrangements. A statement from the Holy Spirit Missionary Sisters said due to the complexity and legal implications of the situation, the order could not confirm date and place of funeral. Sister Rackova was born Jan. 8, 1958, and professed final vows in 1994. As a medical doctor with specialization in tropical diseases, she worked in Ghana. She served as head of the province of Slovakia 2004-2010, after which she was assigned to South Sudan. - - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: CNS photo/Max Rossi, ReutersBy Junno Arocho EstevesVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- After five years of tension and top-level silence, Pope Francis and the grand imam of one of the most important Sunni Muslim universities in the world embraced at the Vatican May 23. "The meeting is the message," the pope told Ahmad el-Tayeb, the grand imam of al-Azhar University, as the religious scholar approached him just inside the door of the papal library. El-Tayeb's spring visit was the first meeting between a pontiff and a grand imam since the Muslim university in Cairo suspended talks in 2011. Established in 1998, the formal dialogue between al-Azhar and the Vatican started to fray in 2006, after now-retired Pope Benedict XVI gave a speech in Regensburg, Germany. Al-Azhar officials and millions of Muslims around the world said the speech linked Islam to violence. Al-Azhar halted the talks altogether in 2011 after the former pope had said Christians in the Middle East were facing persecution. Al-Azhar claimed that Pope Benedict had offended Islam and Muslims once more by focusing only on the suffering of Christians when many Muslims were suffering as well. In February, Bishop Miguel Ayuso Guixot, secretary of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, delivered a letter to el-Tayeb from Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, council president, inviting him to the Vatican to meet the pope. Cardinal Tauran and Bishop Ayuso welcomed the imam to the Vatican May 23 and accompanied him to the papal meeting. Pope Francis sat to the side of his desk facing the grand imam rather than behind his desk as he customarily does when meeting with a visiting head of state. Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, said the pope spoke privately with el-Tayeb for 25 minutes and the conversation included a discussion about "the great significance of this new encounter within the scope of dialogue between the Catholic Church and Islam." "They then dwelled upon the common commitment of the authorities and the faithful of the great religions for world peace, the rejection of violence and terrorism (and) the situation of Christians in the context of conflicts and tensions in the Middle East as well as their protection," Father Lombardi said in a statement. At the end of the audience, Pope Francis presented the grand imam with two gifts: a copy of his encyclical "Laudato Si', on Care for Our Common Home" and peace medallion depicting an olive tree holding together two pieces of a fractured rock. After meeting the pope, the grand imam was scheduled to travel to Paris to open the second international conference on "East and West: Dialogue of Civilizations" May 24 sponsored by al-Azhar University and the Catholic Sant'Egidio Community. - - - Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

  • IMAGE: GIAMPIERO SPOSITOBy Cindy WoodenROME (CNS) -- When Emmanuele Trincas described Roman Cocco as a "bomber" on the soccer field, they both laughed, but it also gave Cocco the confidence he needed to talk about his experience as a Special Olympics athlete. "I know it's not modest," Cocco said, but being chosen to play in an international soccer tournament May 20-22 in Rome "represents how hard I worked." "I never thought I'd get this far," Cocco said. "We'll see what the future holds." Trincas and Cocco trained together for two months for the "Project Unify" tournament in Rome, which was sponsored by the Knights of Columbus and Special Olympics Italia. Four teams from Italy took on teams from France, Hungary, Lithuania and Poland. Project Unify brings together athletes with developmental disabilities and those without. The two learn to appreciate each other's talents, realize what they have in common, overcome preconceived ideas and form friendships. Logan Ludwig, deputy supreme knight of the Knights of Columbus, came to Rome for the tournament, which was played on the Knights' Pius XI Field. He took part in the opening ceremony, which included the parade of athletes and the lighting of an Olympic flame. The Knights, he said, have been involved in the Special Olympics since the games began in the late 1960s. "Special Olympics and the Knights of Columbus have a common purpose: We believe in the sacredness of human life at every stage," Ludwig said. On the Rome field, which has a perfect view of the cupola of St. Peter's Basilica, the athletes -- each in their own language -- also took the Special Olympics oath: "Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt." Ludwig said, "The athletes don't ask for special treatment, they just ask for a chance." Trincas and Cocco realized their dreams of playing in Rome, having fun and making new friends even though their team, representing Italy's Sardinia region, did not end up on top. Those honors went in one division to Albano Primavera -- a team from just outside Rome -- and to the visiting team from Lithuania in the other division.- - -Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.